Soluble Salt Opinions?

May 17, 2017
Elzly Technology Corporation is conducting a survey of coating inspectors on the detection and remediation of soluble salts. We invite all coating inspectors to participate in the survey. The survey should take most users 10-15 minutes to complete (dependent on the extent of experience with salt detection and remediation). The survey can be accessed at the following link:
Soluble Salt Survey

Elzly to Present at DoD Corrosion Conference

April 24, 2017
The Elzly team will be presenting several papers at the DoD - Allied Nations Technical Corrosion Conference in Birmingham, Alabama on August 7 - 10, 2017. We look forward to seeing you there!
2017 DOD - Allied Nations Technical Corrosion Conference

Join Elzly at MegaRust

April 24, 2017
The Elzly team will be presenting papers at MegaRust 2017. Join us in Newport News, VA from June 20-22, 2017 to discuss the latest in Navy corrosion control.
Mega Rust 2017

Technical Publications

Elzly Staff have published extensively during their professional careers. Following is a chronological list of technical papers published or presented by Elzly staff in a variety of subject areas. The search feature in the upper right corner of this page can be used to help you find exactly what you need. Most papers are available for download, however if the paper you are interested in is not available directly, feel free to contact us.

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Title
Abstract
This paper will explore the concept of a "Standard of Care" as applied to coating inspection on industrial coatings projects. Establishing a "Standard of Care" for coating inspection sets an expectation for those providing, procuring or otherwise interacting with inspectors on an industrial coatings job. The paper will present data and anecdotal ev...
[view full abstract]
This paper will explore the concept of a "Standard of Care" as applied to coating inspection on industrial coatings projects. Establishing a "Standard of Care" for coating inspection sets an expectation for those providing, procuring or otherwise interacting with inspectors on an industrial coatings job. The paper will present data and anecdotal evidence suggesting that the range of expectations for coating inspection may have a significant cost impact on industrial coatings projects. Defining one or multiple levels of inspection based on issues such as the type of oversight, degree of sampling and level of authority may lead to more cost‐effective coating projects.
Author
J. Peter Ault, P.E.
Title
"Use of Polysiloxane Coatings for Topside Applications on US Navy Ships"
Abstract
Polysiloxane coatings are the most recent highperformance coatings developed to take advantage of the heat and oxidation resistant properties of silicone-based materials. Commercially available polysiloxane coatings predominately consist of organic-inorganic siloxane materials (though some pure siloxane materials are available). Recently, the US Na...
[view full abstract]
Polysiloxane coatings are the most recent highperformance coatings developed to take advantage of the heat and oxidation resistant properties of silicone-based materials. Commercially available polysiloxane coatings predominately consist of organic-inorganic siloxane materials (though some pure siloxane materials are available). Recently, the US Navy has approved polysiloxane coatings as ?High Durability? in their specification for exterior weather resistant coatings (MIL-PRF-24635 Type V and VI). Navy approval comes after over 20 years of industry development of polysiloxane coatings for high performance industrial and marine applications, yet issues remain with their cost-effective implementation in the Navy fleet. This paper will review experiences of the offshore and marine industry with polysiloxane coatings and provide an update on the Navy adoption of the technology.
Author
J. Peter Ault, Pete Lockwood, Robert Cloutier, David Kinee
Source
NSRP
Title
"Using Electronic Tools and Databases to Manage Coatings used for Corrosion Control"
Abstract
"This paper will explore the use of electronic tools and databases to facilitate efficient use of protective coatings for corrosion control. Electronic tools and databases are available which may impact quality assurance, condition assessment, maintenance planning, and expert systems. For various reasons, few of the tools which are developed gain w...
[view full abstract]
"This paper will explore the use of electronic tools and databases to facilitate efficient use of protective coatings for corrosion control. Electronic tools and databases are available which may impact quality assurance, condition assessment, maintenance planning, and expert systems. For various reasons, few of the tools which are developed gain widespread acceptance or use. Collecting and managing data for corrosion control coatings remains a paper-intensive activity for most owners. The paper will review the author's experience in assisting in the development of several different systems and the lessons learned in the implementation of such systems within the Department of Defense (DoD), private industry, and the bridge industry. The intent is to help future designers developing such systems."
Author
James Ellor and J. Peter Ault
Title
A Test of the Reliability of Mathematically Modeling Corrosion
Abstract
Engineers increasingly solve corrosion control design problems and analyze corrosion processes using mathematical models, particularly finite element-type models. Often this approach becomes complicated and its basis obscure. A pragmatic corrosion engineer may wonder if such approaches constitute window dressing and image projection rather than a s...
[view full abstract]
Engineers increasingly solve corrosion control design problems and analyze corrosion processes using mathematical models, particularly finite element-type models. Often this approach becomes complicated and its basis obscure. A pragmatic corrosion engineer may wonder if such approaches constitute window dressing and image projection rather than a straightforward and understandable engineering approach. The present paper compares finite element modeling predictions to the results of a controlled laboratory full-scale test. The finite element model supposedly predicted the expected life for the anodic alloy tubing where tubing of two different alloys connected with internal flowing seawater. The full-scale test results show that the mathematical model didn't consider either the effects of time and environmental variables or pitting corrosion. The laboratory test results show that neither the measurement of galvanic current nor the mathematical model calculation forms a basis for estimating of the magnitude of the most important type of corrosion of 70/30 CuNi tubing. The laboratory tests identified pitting corrosion as most important. The deepest pit was not immediately adjacent to the Inconel 625 tubing as most mathematical models predict. For the particular tubing configuration tested, turbulence-induced corrosion caused more damage than that relating to the Inconel 625-70/30 CuNi couple. Thus, in-service mismatches between Inconel 625 and 70/30 CuNi tubing may be of more concern about corrosion of the CuNi tubing than galvanic effects. The laboratory testing results comprised physical examination of specimens exposed to flowing seawater for six months with the continuous monitoring of the more significant environmental variables. The comparison of modeling predictions and actual tubing corrosion places suspicion upon the mathematical model. It appears that the model provides reasonable "order of magnitude" estimation of galvanic current flow. The model neither accurately predicted long term current distribution nor the magnitude of pitting corrosion. This raises a very pertinent question -- "If a mathematical model can't reliably handle simple galvanic corrosion, how reliable are such models when applied to more complex situations?"
Author
J. P. Ault, P.E., PCS and J. J. Meany, Jr.
Source
Ocean City Research Corporation, 1993
Title
ACES: Accelerated Corrosion Expert Simulator
Abstract
The US Army?s Accelerated Corrosion Expert Simulator (ACES) simulation and modeling tool is used to predict the deterioration of wheeled vehicles over time due to General (Uniform), Galvanic and Crevice corrosion. The 3-D CAD/CAE geometry, material, coating and auxiliary data, maintenance and operational profiles and environmental data are all prov...
[view full abstract]
The US Army?s Accelerated Corrosion Expert Simulator (ACES) simulation and modeling tool is used to predict the deterioration of wheeled vehicles over time due to General (Uniform), Galvanic and Crevice corrosion. The 3-D CAD/CAE geometry, material, coating and auxiliary data, maintenance and operational profiles and environmental data are all provided as input to a combined physics-based, statistical and heuristically reasoning engine running on a Graphical Processing Unit (GPU) parallel processing system to perform time dependent simulation as to the deterioration of the geometry over time. The detailed 3-D CAD/CAE geometry model of the vehicle is imported into ACES using STEP format along with detail on part materials, coatings and auxiliary data such as the assembly sequence, all of which are typically excluded from the STEP file. An integrity check is then performed on the geometry and supporting data to insure that all the necessary information is present and that there is no missing or inconsistent data, such as non-manifold topology. If the models contain missing geometric detail, it either adds/modifies the files to accommodate the discrepancy if possible or reports the problem back to the end-user for resolution. The software is composed of an assembly of physics-based procedural algorithms, empirical-statistical models from test data and heuristic Artificial Intelligence (AI) methods for representing knowledge from subject matter experts and lessons learned. Simulation prediction algorithms exist for the breakdown of various coating applications, galvanic influence proximity, surface area spread (and pattern) of corrosion over time, location of water collection areas and poultice entrapment areas, microclimate conditions, and the mechanism for corrosion in crevices. The output from the simulator is the relative likelihood of corrosion over time which is color coded either as a progressive time line for a particular part, component or zone of the vehicle, or as a colorized degradation displayed on the 3-D geometry
Author
C. Thomas Savell, Maurizio Borsotto, Scott Woodson, J. Peter Ault, John Repp, Robert Baboian, Carl Handsy, Dan Nymberg and Scott Porter
Source
NACE
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