Soluble Salt Opinions?

May 17, 2017
Elzly Technology Corporation is conducting a survey of coating inspectors on the detection and remediation of soluble salts. We invite all coating inspectors to participate in the survey. The survey should take most users 10-15 minutes to complete (dependent on the extent of experience with salt detection and remediation). The survey can be accessed at the following link:
Soluble Salt Survey

Elzly to Present at DoD Corrosion Conference

April 24, 2017
The Elzly team will be presenting several papers at the DoD - Allied Nations Technical Corrosion Conference in Birmingham, Alabama on August 7 - 10, 2017. We look forward to seeing you there!
2017 DOD - Allied Nations Technical Corrosion Conference

Join Elzly at MegaRust

April 24, 2017
The Elzly team will be presenting papers at MegaRust 2017. Join us in Newport News, VA from June 20-22, 2017 to discuss the latest in Navy corrosion control.
Mega Rust 2017

Technical Publications

Elzly Staff have published extensively during their professional careers. Following is a chronological list of technical papers published or presented by Elzly staff in a variety of subject areas. The search feature in the upper right corner of this page can be used to help you find exactly what you need. Most papers are available for download, however if the paper you are interested in is not available directly, feel free to contact us.

#26 - 30 of 51 total first | 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 | last
Title
Experimentation to Develop a Quantitative Method for Characterizing the Level of Flash Rusting Formed on Carbon Steel after Ultra High Pressure Waterjetting
Abstract
High pressure (HP) and ultra high pressure (UHP) waterjetting for coating removal and surface preparation has several advantages compared to the industry standard abrasive grit blasting process. However, a major drawback of waterjetting is subsequent flash rusting of the steel surface. The color of the flash rust is typically orange, red, or brown ...
[view full abstract]
High pressure (HP) and ultra high pressure (UHP) waterjetting for coating removal and surface preparation has several advantages compared to the industry standard abrasive grit blasting process. However, a major drawback of waterjetting is subsequent flash rusting of the steel surface. The color of the flash rust is typically orange, red, or brown of various shades depending on the color of the underlying steel, the nature of the surrounding environment and the duration of exposure to the environment. Most paint specifications require reworking a flash-rusted surface to reveal bare steel. Additionally, most paint manufacturers will not accept liability if their products are applied over some grades of flash rust. Currently, there is no quantitative or semi-quantitative technique to characterize or categorize the level (or grade) of flash rust. However, descriptive and visual standards developed by SSPC and NACE are available. These standards are routinely used in the waterjetting industry but they are subjective in nature. Attempts have been made in the past or are presently being made by different entities to come up with a more definitive methodology but with limited success. The present paper discusses the results of a research effort to develop quantitative or semi-quantitative method (or methods) to characterize the level of flash rust formed on carbon steel after HP or UHP waterjetting. The objective was to come up with a simple yet reliable and non-subjective method to identify the grade of flash rust. Several different techniques were evaluated which included: (i) Electrochemical Methods [Linear Polarization Resistance (LPR)] tests, interfacial current/resistance measurements, galvanic current measurements and corrosion potential-time response tests); (ii) Colorimetric method; (iii) Modified Tape Test (ISO 8502-3) and (iv) Digital Imaging. Innovative approaches were adopted in using some of the methods. Among all the techniques used, the LPR tests, corrosion potential-time tests, and the colorimetric method showed the most promise. Preliminary guidelines are provided for using these techniques to characterize FR. As far as the authors are aware use of these techniques, particularly electrochemical methods, for characterizing flash rust are not reported in the open literature. More extensive validation is required to develop exact methodologies and protocols in order to formulate guidelines for quantitative characterization of flash rust. Further work is in progress.
Author
J. A. Ellor, P.E
Source
Elzly Technology Corporation
Title
Galvanic Corrosion of Copper-Nickel Sheathed Steel Piling
Abstract
A study was conducted to determine the extent of galvanic corrosion that would be caused by copper-nickel sheathing of offshore steel platforms. The study investigated the effects of selected steel-to-CuNi area ratios on the magnitude and distribution of the galvanic current. One-year seawater exposure tests using segmented CuNi-steel pilings were ...
[view full abstract]
A study was conducted to determine the extent of galvanic corrosion that would be caused by copper-nickel sheathing of offshore steel platforms. The study investigated the effects of selected steel-to-CuNi area ratios on the magnitude and distribution of the galvanic current. One-year seawater exposure tests using segmented CuNi-steel pilings were conducted near Ocean City, NJ. The results of the study suggest that for piling configurations and lengths of copper-nickel sheathing similar to those included in the study, the maximum galvanic corrosion rate of the steel will be between 0.2 and 0.3 mmly immediately next to the sheathing. The galvanic attack will be confined primarily to the first few meters of piling near to the sheathing. Beyond this, the intensity of galvanic attack will decline markedly.
Author
J. A. Ellor, P.E. and G. A. Gehring, Jr., P.E.
Source
NACE Corrosion 87, Paper No. 357. San Francisco. CA. 1987
Title
How Economics Drive Change in Managing Maintenance Costs
Abstract
Maintenance painting costs can be controlled by proper attention to the true cost drivers. This is best accomplished in a comprehensive program which considers all costs involved in the maintenance painting process.
Author
J. A. Ellor, P.E.
Source
Corrpro Companies, Inc.
Title
INDUSTRIAL PROTECTIVE COATING TRADEOFFS: UNDERSTANDING WHY INDUSTRIAL COATINGS CAN BE COMPLICATED
Abstract
Industrial protective coatings can be surprisingly complicated for the inexperienced user or specifier. For example, when fabricating complex structures the simple question of when during fabrication to paint can have an array of interesting cost and performance implications. Other issues include tradeoffs associated with degree of surface preparat...
[view full abstract]
Industrial protective coatings can be surprisingly complicated for the inexperienced user or specifier. For example, when fabricating complex structures the simple question of when during fabrication to paint can have an array of interesting cost and performance implications. Other issues include tradeoffs associated with degree of surface preparation and inspection for coating coverage. The paper will explore some of the reasons why they can be complicated in the context of four issues that can impact an industrial protective coatings project.
Author
J. Peter Ault
Title
Inspection Techniques for Flash Rust formed after Waterjetting
Abstract
Recent US Navy and NSRP projects have explored alternative inspection techniques for evaluating flash rust on waterjetted surfaces. This paper will summarize investigations into new inspection techniques which have been performed over the past few years.
Author
J. P. Ault, P.E., PCS
#26 - 30 of 51 total first | 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 | last

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