Soluble Salt Opinions?

May 17, 2017
Elzly Technology Corporation is conducting a survey of coating inspectors on the detection and remediation of soluble salts. We invite all coating inspectors to participate in the survey. The survey should take most users 10-15 minutes to complete (dependent on the extent of experience with salt detection and remediation). The survey can be accessed at the following link:
Soluble Salt Survey

Elzly to Present at DoD Corrosion Conference

April 24, 2017
The Elzly team will be presenting several papers at the DoD - Allied Nations Technical Corrosion Conference in Birmingham, Alabama on August 7 - 10, 2017. We look forward to seeing you there!
2017 DOD - Allied Nations Technical Corrosion Conference

Join Elzly at MegaRust

April 24, 2017
The Elzly team will be presenting papers at MegaRust 2017. Join us in Newport News, VA from June 20-22, 2017 to discuss the latest in Navy corrosion control.
Mega Rust 2017

Technical Publications

Elzly Staff have published extensively during their professional careers. Following is a chronological list of technical papers published or presented by Elzly staff in a variety of subject areas. The search feature in the upper right corner of this page can be used to help you find exactly what you need. Most papers are available for download, however if the paper you are interested in is not available directly, feel free to contact us.

#36 - 40 of 51 total first | 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 | last
Title
Performance of Polymer Corrugated Coated Steel Pipe
Abstract
The durability of drainage pipe is a concern to the civil engineer. The National Corrugated Steel Pipe Association (NCSPA) has developed a Test Protocol for the evaluation of new coatings. The protocol includes a laboratory simulation and field service component. Concurrent with the protocol development, the industry has worked with several manufac...
[view full abstract]
The durability of drainage pipe is a concern to the civil engineer. The National Corrugated Steel Pipe Association (NCSPA) has developed a Test Protocol for the evaluation of new coatings. The protocol includes a laboratory simulation and field service component. Concurrent with the protocol development, the industry has worked with several manufacturers to develop improved coatings to improve corrugated steel pipe (CSP) durability. This paper will discuss the laboratory simulation testing and field service evaluations of one of those coatings -- polymer-coated corrugated steel pipe. Field inspections document over 20 years of field performance in eight states and a variety of service environments. The combination of simulation test results and field evaluations show the coating is highly resistant to abrasion and delamination and can extend the service life of corrugated steel pipe in excess of 50 years.
Author
J. P. Ault, P.E., PCS
Source
Corrpro Companies, Inc., TRB 2003 Annual Meeting
Title
Predicting Corrosion Impacts on Materiel Availability
Abstract
"The impacts of corrosion are not the key focus in the design and evaluation of military equipment due to the fact that corrosion is not a Key Performance Parameter (KPP). KPPs are attributes or characteristics of a system that are considered critical or essential to the development of an effective military capability. While corrosion is not a KP...
[view full abstract]
"The impacts of corrosion are not the key focus in the design and evaluation of military equipment due to the fact that corrosion is not a Key Performance Parameter (KPP). KPPs are attributes or characteristics of a system that are considered critical or essential to the development of an effective military capability. While corrosion is not a KPP, it is possible that it can be a factor in the capacity to meet the Materiel Availability KPP or the supporting Material Reliability and Ownership Cost Key System Attributes (KSA). Therefore a deliberate effort to mitigate corrosion should be made to meet this KPP or else there is potential that failure will occur when pieces of equipment are out of service due to excessive corrosion. This paper will demonstrate that through the study and evaluation of corrosion performance/ monitoring data, it is possible to estimate corrosion impacts on availability and reliability. This data will allow us to represent the progression of corrosion impacts throughout the fleet, highlighting areas where excessive deterioration leads to a stage where the item of interest may no longer be able to perform its mission. With this knowledge, planned preventative maintenance intervals and efforts can be identified in an effort to comply with the Materiel Availability KPP and the Material Readiness KSA. Additionally, the data can be used to estimate the corrosion impacts on life cycle cost to ensure that there is no dire effect on the Ownership Cost KSA due to corrosion impacts. "
Author
James Ellor and Lauren Paladino
Source
Army Corrosion Conference
Title
Preliminary Evaluation and Comparison of Aluminum Coatings Provided by Electroplating and Ion Vapor Deposition Processes on Steel Substrates
Abstract
Metallic coatings that are anodic to steel, such as aluminum, cadmium and zinc, provide both barrier and sacrificial protection to the steel substrate in most common environments. Aluminum coatings are typically applied through ion vapor deposition (IVD). Recently, the practice of aluminum electroplating has been commercialized in the United States...
[view full abstract]
Metallic coatings that are anodic to steel, such as aluminum, cadmium and zinc, provide both barrier and sacrificial protection to the steel substrate in most common environments. Aluminum coatings are typically applied through ion vapor deposition (IVD). Recently, the practice of aluminum electroplating has been commercialized in the United States. The aluminum coatings offered by both processes offer similar performance benefits and limitations, as examined during slow strain rate, paint adhesion and torque/tension testing of steel test samples. Marine atmospheric corrosion resistance of the electroplated aluminum coatings was high. The high performance levels of the aluminum coatings make them possible alternatives to cadmium platings for some applications. This paper reviews some of the available information for IVD and electroplated aluminum coatings, discusses the performance of electroplated and IVD aluminum coatings on steel and compares the performance of the aluminum coatings to zinc, zinc alloy and cadmium platings.
Author
K. Cramer, J. P. Ault, P.E., PCS and C. Hartline
Source
Ocean City Research Corporation, June 1997 SUR/FIN Conf., Det., MI (sponsored by the American Electroplaters and Surface Finishers Society (AESF))
Title
Proof of Concept for an Adhesion Measurement Device to Predict Overcoating Failures in the Field
Abstract
Overcoating an existing bridge coating system can be an economical solution to maintain bridges. Overcoating eliminates the costs for removal of old, often hazardous coating systems that were possibly applied years ago. However, prior to the overcoating process, it is necessary to establish that the existing coating is well adhered to the substrate...
[view full abstract]
Overcoating an existing bridge coating system can be an economical solution to maintain bridges. Overcoating eliminates the costs for removal of old, often hazardous coating systems that were possibly applied years ago. However, prior to the overcoating process, it is necessary to establish that the existing coating is well adhered to the substrate. Coatings with inadequate adhesion must be removed. Unfortunately, though some standard test methods are available, the determination of a well-adhered coating is not an exact science. It is well known that during the curing process some overcoat systems can develop a significant level of shear stress (i.e. stress acting tangential to the coating film) amounting to as much as 1300 psi. This stress, in combination with stresses due to structure vibration and thermal stresses can lead to the disbondment of the existing coating on the bridge structure. Indeed, such a phenomenon is observed in practice and often within 1 to 2 years of completion of the overcoating project. The present paper discusses the conceptual design(s) for a prototype field adhesion tool which can recreate the shear stresses developed by the overcoat system and can then be potentially used in the field to predict overcoating failures. Further development work for the device is required.
Author
M. Islam, PhD, CEng., J. P. Repp, P.E., and J.A. Ellor, P.E.
Source
Corrpro Companies, Inc.
Title
Quantification of Curing Stresses in Paints and Coatings
Abstract
The present paper describes a research effort to quantify the internal stresses that develop in a coating system during curing and exposure. Several common overcoating systems (typically used for bridge structures) were investigated that included a poly silicone alkyd, an acrylic, a moisture-cured urethane and an epoxy. The work reported in this pa...
[view full abstract]
The present paper describes a research effort to quantify the internal stresses that develop in a coating system during curing and exposure. Several common overcoating systems (typically used for bridge structures) were investigated that included a poly silicone alkyd, an acrylic, a moisture-cured urethane and an epoxy. The work reported in this paper constitutes part of an NCHRP-IDEA project; the main objective of which was to design and demonstrate an innovative field device to assess the risk of overcoating failures. Work related to the design and development of the adhesion tester is the subject of another paper to be published later. Two methods of measuring cure-induced stresses in coatings were examined: (a) Deflection measurements using a capacitive transducer and (b) Direct measurements using a miniature surface mounted fiber optic (FO) strain gage. The latter technique was chosen for conducting the experiments because of accuracy and ease of use. The results indicated that the ambient relative humidity (RH) has a significant effect on the type and magnitude of stresses developed by different types of coatings during curing and aging. The stresses measured during this program were found to be as high as 9 to 11 MPa (1305 to 1595 psi), similar to cure stresses reported in the literature.
Author
M. Islam, Ph.D., C.Eng., J. Repp, P.E., J. A. Ellor, P.E., and B. Shaw, P.E.
Source
Corrpro Companies, Inc., Ocean City Research Corporation
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